Gali Guleiyan; lost and found in a maze of memories

Newbie Dipesh Jain's psychological thriller about a man who is a prisoner of his own past is an offbeat yet fascinating watch.

Gali Guleiyan; lost and found in a maze of memories

Newbie Dipesh Jain's psychological thriller about a man who is a prisoner of his own past is an offbeat yet fascinating watch.

Talkietive Review brings you the 5 Good Things to look out for, in the film.


Watch the video here

1. Story Wise: Director Dipesh Jain has written a poignant story which explores the complexities of a man, Khuddus (Manoj Bajpayee), who is held captive by his troubled past. Alternating with the story of Idris (Om Singh), the plot unfolds in unexpected ways. The characters are complex and layered and yet Jain keeps the story on course, seldom allowing it to move too far away from the central plot and the characters.

2. Cinematography: One of the shots in the film— of several rooftops stacked in uneasy rows with an opening in the centre resembling a trapdoor evokes a sense of suffocation, a feeling of the walls closing in. Kai Miedendorp's cinematography frames Khuddus's misery and decadence with just the perfect degree of melancholy and despair.

3. Designed to please: Sujata Desai Sharma Virk has left no stone unturned in creating a world that is crumbling, falling apart. Whether it is the cloistered passages, mangled pillars or Khuddus's CCTV cameras, one can spot Virk's unerring eye for attention to details.

4. Surround Sound: Unlike other films, Gali Guleiyan uses silence rather well. Dialogues are sparse and Bob Kellough employs sound to cut through the silence effectively. One of the striking features about the film is the stillness within the four walls alternating with the occasional sounds depicting the humdrum life around.

5. Power Packed Performances: Actor Manoj Bajpayee as Khuddus, is on familiar territory. This is a role that allows him ample chance to display his mastery and he does not disappoint. He is immaculate in projecting the inner turmoil without excessive gestures or verbose dialogues, an evidence of Bajpayee's hold on the craft. Om Singh as Idris, a traumatised adolescent resentful of his father Liakat' s(Neeraj Kabi) trespasses, displays a maturity well beyond his years. In a predominantly male ensemble, Shahana Goswami as Iddu's mother Saira, is spontaneous and a great fit in the matronly role

This review originally appeared on www.talkietive.in

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